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RSNA Press Release

At A Glance:
  • Alcohol use by expectant mothers can lead to problems with the mental and physical development of their children.
  • Advancements in MRI are affording unprecedented insights into the effects of alcohol on the central nervous systems of children whose mothers drank alcohol during pregnancy.
  • Costs for care of individuals affected by fetal alcohol syndrome in the U.S. have been estimated at $4 billion annually.

Fetal Alcohol Exposure Affects Brain Structure in Children

Released: November 25, 2012

Media Contacts: RSNA Newsroom 1-312-949-3233
Before 11/24/12 or after 11/29/12: RSNA Media Relations: 1-630-590-7762

Linda Brooks
1-630-590-7738
lbrooks@rsna.org
Maureen Morley
1-630-590-7754
mmorley@rsna.org

CHICAGO—Children exposed to alcohol during fetal development exhibit changes in brain structure and metabolism that are visible using various imaging techniques, according to a new study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Alcohol use by expectant mothers can lead to problems with the mental and physical development of their children—a condition known as fetal alcohol syndrome. Research suggests an incidence of 0.2 to 1.5 per 1,000 live births, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Costs for care of individuals affected by fetal alcohol syndrome in the U.S. have been estimated at $4 billion annually.

Advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are affording unprecedented insights into the effects of alcohol on the central nervous systems of children whose mothers drank alcohol during their pregnancy. Recently, researchers in Poland used three different MRI techniques to better define these effects.

The study group included 200 children who were exposed to alcohol during their fetal stage and 30 children whose mothers did not drink while pregnant or during lactation. Researchers used MRI to evaluate the size and shape of the corpus callosum, the bundle of nerve fibers that forms the major communication link between the right and left halves of the brain, in the two groups. Prenatal alcohol exposure is the major cause of impaired development or complete absence of the corpus callosum.

The MRI results showed statistically significant thinning of the corpus callosum in the children exposed to alcohol compared with the other group.

"These changes are strongly associated with psychological problems in children," said Andrzej Urbanik, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

Dr. Urbanik and colleagues also used diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) to study six areas of the central nervous system in the children. DWI maps the diffusion process of water and can be a more sensitive means than traditional MRI for detecting tissue abnormalities.

Children in the alcohol group exhibited statistically significant increases in diffusion on DWI compared with the other children.

"The increase of diffusion indicates neurological disorders or damage to the brain tissue," Dr. Urbanik said.

To noninvasively study metabolism in the brains of the children, the researchers used proton (hydrogen) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS), a common adjunct to structural MRI studies. HMRS results showed a complex collection of metabolic changes.

"In individual cases, we found a high degree of metabolic changes that were specific for particular locations within the brain," Dr. Urbanik said.

Coauthors are Teresa Jadczak-Szumiło, M.Sc., Monica Nardzewska-Szczepanik, M.D., Paulina Karcz, M.Sc., and Justyna Kozub, M.Sc.

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Note: Copies of RSNA 2012 news releases and electronic images will be available online at RSNA.org/press12 beginning Monday, Nov. 26.

RSNA is an association of more than 50,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists promoting excellence in patient care and health care delivery through education, research and technologic innovation. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

Editor's note: The data in these releases may differ from those in the published abstract and those actually presented at the meeting, as researchers continue to update their data right up until the meeting. To ensure you are using the most up-to-date information, please call the RSNA Newsroom at 1-312-949-3233.

For patient-friendly information on MRI, visit RadiologyInfo.org.

Abstract:

Video clips

  • (.MP4 format)
    1. Video clip (5,989 Kbyte)
      Dr. Urbanik discusses the negative effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
    2. Video clip (1,978 Kbyte)
      Dr. Urbanik discusses the methodology of the study.
    3. Video clip (943 Kbyte)
      Dr. Urbanik discusses the results of the study.
    4. Video clip (2,689 Kbyte)
      Dr. Urbanik discusses the results of the study.
    5. Video clip (5,096 Kbyte)
      A brief overview of the methodology used in Dr. Urbanik’s study.
    6. Video clip (3,958 Kbyte)
      A brief synopsis of the methodology used in Dr. Urbanik’s study.
    7. Video clip (461 Kbyte)
      Video clip showing radiologic technologists reviewing medical images.
    8. Video clip (260 Kbyte)
      Video clip showing radiologic technologists reviewing medical images.

Image (.JPG format)

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Figure 1. SHDxt15: Photograph of a GE Signa HDxt 1.5T MRI machine.

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RSNA 2012 Newsroom