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RSNA Press Release

RSNA Presents Special Presidential Award to Hans G. Ringertz, M.D., Ph.D.

Released: December 1, 2010

Media Contacts: RSNA Newsroom 1-312-949-3233
Before 11/27/2010 or after 12/02/2010: RSNA Media Relations: 1-630- 590-7762

Linda Brooks
1-630-590-7738
lbrooks@rsna.org

Chicago, December 1, 2010 — Today the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) presented its Special Presidential Award to Hans G. Ringertz, M.D., Ph.D., of Linköping, Sweden. RSNA reserves the Special Presidential Award for individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of radiology or the radiologic sciences.

During his nearly 50 years in medicine, Dr. Ringertz has worked tirelessly to preserve, defend, expand and advance radiology.

"Professor Ringertz is the proverbial man for all seasons," said 2010 RSNA President Hedvig Hricak, M.D., Ph.D., Dr. h.c. "He is the pioneer of pediatric MR imaging, a world leader in radiation safety, and he headed one of the most prestigious university radiologic departments in the world. His membership and presidency of the Nobel committee always ensured biomedical imaging a fair review."

Since 2006, Dr. Ringertz has been a professor of radiology at Linköping University Hospital in Linköping, Sweden, and chairman of the board for the university's Centre for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization. He was a professor and chairman of radiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm from 1984 to 2006 and has served as a professor emeritus since.

In 1960 and 1961, Dr. Ringertz published some of the first peer-reviewed papers on the molecular structure of myelin. He completed his biophysics doctorate at Karolinska Institute in 1969 with a thesis on the detailed molecular structure of purins and their degradation. In 1984, he published some of the earliest peer-reviewed papers on MR imaging in children and neonates while a visiting professor at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).

During his career Dr. Ringertz has researched pediatric cardiac, urogenital and oncologic imaging. Much of his research focused on measurements in pediatric radiology, especially for evaluation of normal versus abnormal size of structures and organs. He has also been a radiation protection advocate, with longtime service to many organizations including the International Commission on Radiation Protection.

He served for 20 years on the Nobel Assembly for Physiology and Medicine, which he chaired in 2003.

Dr. Ringertz received RSNA honorary membership in 1997. He also has received honorary membership in numerous other societies around the globe and the gold medal of the European Congress of Radiology in 2005.

"This very special award is a great honor for me," Dr. Ringertz said. "Personally I owe most of whatever achievement I have had in my professional career to my mentors, most of whom are American. With that background, getting first RSNA honorary membership and now the special presidential award strikes me as unreal—it is I who should express my gratitude to American radiology for all the possibilities it has given to me."

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Note: Copies of RSNA 2010 news releases and electronic images will be available online at RSNA.org/press10 beginning Monday, Nov. 29.

RSNA is an association of more than 44,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists committed to excellence in patient care through education and research. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

Editor's note: The data in these releases may differ from those in the printed abstract and those actually presented at the meeting, as researchers continue to update their data right up until the meeting. To ensure you are using the most up-to-date information, please call the RSNA Newsroom at 1-312-949-3233.

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